Scammer Hande Kacar Hande

Hande
Hande
Kacar
1987.11.30 /29years
Tbilisi/ Georgia
Tbilisi

User comments

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Comment #129306
I want to start that I got used a lot to you during our correspondence.
I want to meet you very much. I asked you for help but you didn't believe me and refused me.
It is so offensive. But I understand that it is very difficult to tust the person you have never seen.
I just want to tell you that sometimes it is necessary to trust people.
There are many honest people in the world. And it was very offensive when you refused to help me.
But I have good news now. I have found money for my trip. I am going to come approximately in 1 week.
I have sold my fur coat. I have already paid for visa and now all I need is to wait when I get it.
I have money for the ticket. They promised me it would be in approximately in 2 or 3 weeks.
I do not know exact dates but I will let you know as soon as I know.
I will get visa for 3 months. Are you happy to hear this? We will be able to meet but not only communicate through the letters.
Perhaps, our relations will grow into more close.
Please, write me your thoughts. I want to know that you still want me to come to your place.
I will be waiting for your reply.
Darling please send me 400 dollar.
I love you
Comment #129675
The U.S. Embassy receives reports almost every day of fraud committed against U.S. citizens by Internet correspondents professing love and romantic interest. Typically, the Russian correspondent asks the U.S. citizen to send money or credit card information for living expenses, travel expenses, or "visa costs." The anonymity of the Internet means that the U.S. citizen cannot be sure of the real name, age, marital status, nationality, or even gender of the correspondent. The U.S. Embassy has received many reports of citizens losing thousands of dollars through such scams. American citizens are advised never to send money to anyone they have not met in person.
Comment #129676
The U.S. Embassy receives reports almost every day of fraud committed against U.S. citizens by Internet correspondents professing love and romantic interest. Typically, the Russian correspondent asks the U.S. citizen to send money or credit card information for living expenses, travel expenses, or "visa costs." The anonymity of the Internet means that the U.S. citizen cannot be sure of the real name, age, marital status, nationality, or even gender of the correspondent. The U.S. Embassy has received many reports of citizens losing thousands of dollars through such scams. American citizens are advised never to send money to anyone they have not met in person.